New Faces in Political Methodology Conference

Since 2008, QuaSSI has been proud to host New Faces in Political Methodology, a conference that invites an eclectic group of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to come together and discuss their methodology and methodology-adjacent work with each other and with the multi-disciplinary QuaSSI, BDSS, and SoDA communities at Penn State.

From 2008-2017, 76 early career scholars from 31 different graduate programs have been featured as "New Faces." 

New Faces in Political Methodology IX will be held on Saturday, April 29, 2017, and will feature:

Sarah Bouchat (University of Wisconsin)

"Careers & Causes in Authoritarian Legislatures: Clustering Text-Based Elicited Priors."

Sarah Bouchat is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison with research interests in political methodology, comparative political economy, and authoritarian politics with a regional focus on Southeast Asia. Sarah's current work focuses on elicited priors, as well as machine learning and Bayesian statistical applications for the study of low information, authoritarian regimes like Myanmar. 

Sarah Bouchat

Andreu Casas (University of Washington)

"Computer Vision for Political Science Research: A Study of Online Protest Images."

Andreu Casas is a PhD student in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington. Andreu's research interests encompass the areas of political communication, comparative public policy, and computational social sciences. He is particularly interested in how social movements and interest groups influence the political agenda and the decision making process in the current media environment. His methodological interests and strengths are causal inference, computer vision, natural language processing, and machine learning and artificial intelligence in general. In his dissertation he uses computer vision methods to study under which circumstances online visual communications help advocacy groups get their message across. He also works on an NSF-funded big data project studying how the content of bills evolve as they move through the legislative process. His work has appeared in American Politics ResearchAnnual Review of Political Science, and Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológica.

Andreu Casas

Mia Costa (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

"Improving Measures of Responsiveness for Elite Audit Experiments."

Mia Costa is a Political Science PhD candidate at the University of Massachusetts Amherst with a focus in American Politics and Political Methodology. Mia studies representation, participation and mobilization, experimental methods, and political networks. She is also interested in survey methodology and have served as a UMass Poll Research Fellow since 2014. She is the Editorial Book Review Associate for the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis and works with the Environmental Defense Fund as a research consultant to design and analyze large-scale Get-Out-the-Vote field experiments. Her work has appeared in Review of Policy Research and Political Behavior.

Mia Costa

Jennifer Cryer (Stanford University)

"Candidate Identity and Strategic Communication: Exploratory Analysis of the Influence of Race, Gender, and Party on Topic Selection."

Jennifer is a Ph.D. student at Stanford University, in the Department of Political Science. Jenn is also a 2015 National Science Foundation, Graduate Research Fellow, and a Stanford University E.D.G.E. Doctoral Fellow under the Vice Provost of Graduate Education. Her primary field of study is American politics, and she specializes, broadly, in political psychology, political behavior, and political communication. Specifically, she focuses on race/ethnicity; the perception, and communication strategies, of minority candidates; and the behavior of minority voters. Currently, her research focuses on how candidate race and gender impact voter assessments, and how candidate race and gender influence campaign communication strategies. Moreover, other work addresses how the race of individual voters within a district may compel candidates to engage in certain communication strategies. She draws upon a large corpus of campaign communication texts to observe the slight variation in issue ownership, topic selection and messaging.

Jennifer Cryer

Matthew Denny (Pennsylvania State University)

"The Politics of Bureaucratic Constraint: How Congress Uses Legal Language To Achieve Political Goals."

Matthew Denny is a Ph.D. student in Political Science and Social Data Analytics at Penn State and NSF Big Data Social Science IGERT Fellow. The substantive focus of Matt's work centers on the study of Congress, state and local bureaucracy, and organizational dynamics, through the use of computational social science methods. In service of this research agenda, he focuses on developing and implementing machine learning algorithms for analyzing social processes. He has a particular interest in developing new statistical models for text, networks, and text-valued networks. His work has appeared in Social NetworksPublic Administration ReviewPLoS One, and EMNLP.

Matthew Denny

Laurel Eckhouse (University of California, Berkeley)

"Everyday Risk: Exposure Disproportion and Racial Disparities in Police Shootings."

Laurel Eckhouse is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of California, Berkeley.  Laurel studies the politics of criminal justice, racial and ethnic politics, political methodology, and public law in the United States.  She uses a mix of methods, including quantitative empirical techniques, formal modeling, and ethnographic observation. Her dissertation and book project investigates the institutional origins of inequalities in the application of state power, specifically in the context of policing in the United States.  She works with the Prison University Project at San Quentin State Prison and the Human Rights Data Analysis Group, and she recently published a discussion of how machine learning algorithms can reinforce racial bias in the criminal justice system in The Washington Post.

Laurel Eckhouse

Fridolin Linder (Pennsylvania State University)

"Text as Policy: Measuring Policy Similarity through Bill Text Reuse."

Fridolin Linder is a PhD Candidate in Political Science and Social Data Analytics at the Pennsylvania State University. Frido is studying the application of statistical and machine learning tools to social science questions. My projects focus on the application of modern text analysis tools to social media content, legislative and human rights text and the measurement of social scientific concept such as ideology. He works with the Interdependence in Governance and Policy Lab, was a Trainee in the Penn State Big Data Social Science IGERT, and was a Data Science for Social Good Summer Fellow at the University of Chicago. 

Fridolin Linder

Anton Strezhnev (Harvard University)

"Robust Methods to Adjust for Attrition and Survival Bias."

Anton Stezhnev is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Government at Harvard University. His research focuses on developing new methods for estimating causal effects in observational data. Substantively, his research encompasses international political economy, international organizations, and judicial politics. His dissertation studies the strategic and attitudinal factors that influence the decision-making of arbitrators in investor-state arbitration. His poster titled 'A new method for estimating treatment effects under “truncation-by-death"' won the 2016 Society for Political Methodology Poster Award. Recently, his article on dynamic ideal point estimation in the UN General Assembly (with Erik Voeten and Michael Bailey) was published in the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

Anton Strezhnev

Baobao Zhang (Yale University)

"Quota Sampling Using Facebook Advertisements Can Generate Nationally Representative Opinion Estimates." (coauthored with Matto Mildenberger, Peter D. Howe, Jennifer Marlon, Seth Rosenthal, and Anthony Leiserowitz)

Baobao Zhang is a PhD candidate at Yale University's political science department. Her research interests include survey methodology, causal inference, and public policy. Baobao's dissertation uses natural experiments and field experiments to study how welfare policies affect Americans' political attitudes and behavior. She works as a data scientist for the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, and her work on a survey of trauma hospitals in Syria was published in JAMA Surgery.

Baobao Zhang

Yang-Yang Zhou (Princeton University)

"How Refugees Affect Conceptions of Citizenship in Africa."

Yang-Yang Zhou is a Ph.D. candidate in the Politics Department at Princeton University, specializing in comparative politics with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Yang-Yang's research interests include migration and citizenship; public service delivery; and experimental, survey, and GIS methodologies. Her dissertation develops a theory of nation-building in Africa by examining how weak borders and forced migration change conceptions of national identity and citizenship for local, host populations. She is working on randomized control trials of policy interventions in East Africa (with Twaweza and MIT) and Afghanistan (with Mercy Corps and Yale), and her work on methods for asking sensitive survey questions has appeared in the Journal of the American Statistical Association.

Yang-Yang Zhou

 

(New Faces was not held in 2016 due to faculty leaves.)

 

New Faces in Political Methodology VIII was held on April 25, 2015, and featured: 

Drew Dimmery (New York University).

"Ideological Nonprofits? Inferring Political Ideology of Ostensibly Non-partisan Organizations," coauthored with Andrew Peterson. This paper was published (as "Shining the Light on Dark Money: Political Spending by Nonprofits.") in RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences.

Drew received his PhD in 2016 and is currently a Research Data Scientist in the Core Data Science Team's Experiments and Causal Inference group at Facebook. 

Drew Dimmery

Anita Gohdes (University of Mannheim).

"Information, Connectivity, and Strategic State Repression." This paper was published (as "Pulling the Plug: Network Disruptions and Violence in Civil Conflict") in the Journal of Peace Research.

Anita received her PhD in 2015 and served from 2015-16 as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs & Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. She is currently an Assistant Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at the University of Zurich. 

Anita Gohdes

Alex Hughes (University of California, San Diego).

"Social Voting and Election Coordination in Rural Honduras."

Alex received his PhD in 2016 and is currently a post-doctoral research scholar at the Berkeley Institute for Data Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

Alex Hughes

Dean Knox (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

"A Model for Path Data."

Dean is expected to receive his PhD in 2017 and will begin a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton University in Fall 2017.

Dean Knox

Christopher Lucas (Harvard University).

"The Balance-Sample Size Frontier in Matching Methods for Causal Inference," coauthored with Gary King and Richard Nielsen. This paper was published in the American Journal of Political Science.

Christopher Lucas

Inga Schwabe (University of Twente [Department of Research Methodology, Measurement, and Data Analysis]).

"Genes, Culture and Conservatism: A Psychometric-Genetic Approach," coauthored with Wilfired Jonker and Stephanie M. van den Berg. This paper was published in Behavioral Genetics.

Inga received her PhD in 2016 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Methodology and Statistics at Tilburg University. 

Inga Schwabe

Jane Lawrence Sumner (Emory University).

"Commitment without Control: Within-Country Variation in Political Risk and the Efficacy of Bilateral Investment Treaties."

Jane received her PhD in 2016 and is currently Assistant Professor and Benjamin E. Lippincott Chair in Political Economy in the Department of Political Science at the University of Minnesota.

Jane Lawrence Sumner

New Faces in Political Methodology VII was held on April 26, 2014, and featured

Adeline Lo (University of California, San Diego).

"Predicting Civil Wars with Higher Order Interactions."

Adeline received her PhD in 2016 and is currently a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University.

Adeline Lo

Paasha Mahdavi (University of California, Los Angeles).

"Extortion in the Oil States: Nationalization, Regulatory Structure and Corruption."

Paasha received his PhD in 2015 and is currently an Assistant Professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University.

Paasha Mahdavi

Jason Morgan (Ohio State University).

"The Latent Path Model for Dynamic Social Networks with an Application to Party Switching in Poland."

Jason received his PhD in 2015 and is currently a Data Scientist at Nationwide and visiting scholar in the Department of Political Science at Ohio State University.

Jason Morgan

Constanza Schibber (Washington University in St. Louis).

"The Success of the Legislative Median: Variations in the Separation of Powers and Budget Allocations."

Constanza received her PhD in 2016, is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Methodology and Data Science at the University of Virginia, and will join the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University as an Assistant Professor in Fall 2017.

Constanza Schibber

Emily Schilling (University of Iowa).

"Field of Forces: Strategic Interdependence in Legislative Behavior."

Emily received her PhD in 2015 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Tennessee.

Emily Schilling

Yuki Shiraito (Princeton University).

"Strengthening Weak Instruments by Modeling Compliance," coauthored with Mark Ratkovic.

Yuki expects to receive his PhD in 2017 and will join the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor of Political Science in Fall 2017.

Yuki Shiraito

Neelanjan Sircar (Columbia University).

"Analyzing Randomized Experiments with Spillovers."

Neelanjan received his PhD in 2014. He is currently a Senior Fellow at the Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania.

Neelanjan Sircar

Brandon Stewart (Harvard University).

"Computer Assisted Text Analysis for Comparative Politics," co-authored with Christopher Lucas, Richard Nielsen, Margaret E. Roberts, Alex Storer, and Dustin Tingley. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Brandon received his PhD in 2015 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Princeton University. 

Brandon Stewart

 

New Faces in Political Methodology VI was held April 27, 2013, and featured:

Olga Chyzh (University of Iowa).

"Tell Me Who Your Friends Are: An Endogenous Model of International Network Formation and Effect." This paper was awarded best paper at the International Studies Association - Midwest 2013, and was published  (as "Dangerous Liaisons: An Endogenous Model of International Trade and Human Rights") in the Journal of Peace Research.

Olga is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Department of Statistics at Iowa State University. 

Olga Chyzh

Elizabeth Coggins (University of North Carolina).

"Beyond the Thermostat: Lessons from Policy-Specific Public Opinion," coauthored with James Stimson, Mary Layton Atkinson, and Frank Baumgartner.

Elizabeth earned her PhD in 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Colorado College.

Elizabeth Coggins

Chad Hazlett (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

"Kernel Regularized Least Squares: Moving Beyond Linearity and Additivity without Sacrificing Interpretability," coauthored with Jens Hainmueller. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Chad received his PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Statistics at UCLA. 

Chad Hazlett

Matt Hitt (Ohio State University).

"Improving Inferences from Multiple Structural Change Models."

Matt earned his PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Colorado State University.

Matt Hitt

In Song Kim (Princeton University).

"Political Cleavages within Industry: Firm Level Lobbying for Trade Liberalization." This paper was awarded the 2013 International Political Economy Society best paper award, was included in his dissertation which was awarded the 2015 Mancur Olson Award for the best dissertation in Political Economy from the American Political Science Association, and was published in the American Political Science Review.

In Song earned his PhD in 2014, and he is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at MIT. 

In Song Kim

Jennifer Pan (Harvard University).

"Measuring the Goals and Incentives of Local Chinese Officials." This paper is forthcoming (as "How Chinese Officials Use the Internet to Construct their Public Image") in Political Science Research and Methods.

Jen received her PhD in 2015 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford University.  

Jennifer Pan

Keith Schnakenberg (Washington University in St Louis).

"Scoring from Contests," co-authored with Elizabeth Maggie Penn. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Keith received his PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. 

Keith Schnakenberg

 

 

New Faces in Political Methodology V was held on April 28, 2012, and featured:

Adriana Crespo-Tenorio (Washington University in St Louis).

"Bayesian Analysis of Change Points: A Bivariate Approach."

Adriana received her PhD in 2013 and is currently Lead Researcher at Facebook.

Adriana Crespo-Tenorio

Adrienne Hosek (University of California - Berkeley).

"Tax Preferences on the Income Roller Coaster."

Adrienne received her PhD in 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC-Davis.

Adrienne Hosek

Molly Cohn Jackman (Stanford University).

"Legislative Organization and the Second Face of Power: Evidence from the US State Legislatures," coauthored with Sarah Anzia. This paper was published in the Journal of Politics.

Molly received her PhD in 2013 and is currently Public Policy Research Manager at Facebook. 

Molly Jackman

Brenton Kenkel (University of Rochester).

"A General Solution to Nonignorable Missing Outcomes in Binary Choice Data." This research won the Best Graduate Student Poster Award at the Society for Political Methodology summer meeting.

Brenton received his PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University.   

Brenton Kenkel

Michele Margolis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

"Disentangling the Relationship between Religion and Politics: How Partisanship Affects Religious Beliefs." This paper is forthcoming (as "Cognitive Dissonance, Elections, and Religion: How Partisanship and the Political Landscape Shape Religious Behaviors") in Public Opinion Quarterly, and a book on the research, From Politics to the Pews: How Partisanship Affects Religious Behaviors and Identifications in America, is under contract with University of Chicago Press.

Michele received her PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. 
 

Michele Margolis

Brendan O'Connor (Carnegie Mellon [Machine Learning]).

"Statistical Learning of Frames from Text."

Brendan received his PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences, and affiliate of the Computational Social Science Institute, at UMass Amherst.

Brendan O'Connor

Douglas Rice (Pennsylvania State University).

"Measuring the Issue Content of Supreme Court Opinions through Probabilistic Topic Models." This paper was published (as "Issue Divisions and U.S. Supreme Court Decision Making") in the Journal of Politics.

Doug is currently an Assistant Professor of Legal Studies in the Department of Political Science , and affiliate of the Computational Social Science Institute, at UMass Amherst. 

Douglas Rice

Margaret (Molly) Roberts (Harvard University).

"How Robust Standard Errors Expose Problems They Do Not Fix," coauthored with Gary King. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Molly received her PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC - San Diego. 

Molly Roberts

 

New Faces in Political Methodology IV was held on April 30, 2011, and featured:

Nicole Asmussen (University of Rochester).

"Anchors Away: A New Approach to Estimating Ideal Points across Time and Chambers," coauthored with Jinhee Jo. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Nicole received her PhD in 2011 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Oakland University. 

Nicole Asmussen

Matthew Blackwell (Harvard University).

"A Framework for Dynamic Causal Inference in Political Science." This paper was published in the American Journal of Political Science.

Matt received his PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard University. 

Matt Blackwell

Allison Sovey Carnegie (Yale University [Political Science and Economics]).

"Beyond LATE: A Simple Method for Recovering Sample Average Treatment Effects," coauthored with Peter Aronow. This paper was published in Political Analysis.

Allison received her PhD in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. 

Allison Carnegie

Devin Caughey (University of California - Berkeley).

"Regression Discontinuity Designs and Popular Elections: Implications of Pro-Incumbent Bias in Close U.S. House Races," co-authored with Jasjeet Sekhon. This paper was published in Political Analysis and was awarded the 2012 Warren Miller Prize.

Devin received his PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at MIT. 

Devin Caughey

Daniel Hill (Florida State University).

"Strategic Incentives and Modeling Bias in Ordinal Data: The Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit Model in Political Science," co-authored with Benjamin Bagozzi, Will Moore, and Bumba Mukherjee. This paper was published (as "Modeling Two Types of Peace: The Zero-inflated Ordered Probit (ZiOP) Model in Conflict Research") in the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

Danny is currently an Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the University of Georgia.

 

Danny Hill

Kentaro Hirose (University of Chicago).

"Markov Regime-Switching Panel Models: An Application to Militarized Interstate Disputes."

Kentaro received his PhD in 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor at the Waseda Institute for Advanced Study.

Justin Kirkland (University of North Carolina).

"Measuring Uncertainty in Community Detection for Weighted Networks." This paper was published (as "Hypothesis Testing for Group Structure in Legislative Networks") in State Politics & Policy Quarterly.

Justin received his PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston. 

Justin Kirkland

Eleonora Mattiacci (Ohio State University).

"The Fog of Peace: Uncertainty, War and the Resumption of International Crises," co-authored with Bear Braumoeller.

Eleonora received her PhD in 2014. She is currently Karl Lowenstein Post-Doctoral Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Amherst College and will be joining the faculty as an Assistant Professor in Fall 2017.

Eleonora Mattiaci

Kelly Rader (Columbia University).

"Randomization Tests and Inference with Grouped Data."

Kelly received her PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University.

Kelly Rader

Jaime Settle (University of California, San Diego).

"Genes, Negative Affectivity and Turnout: A Mobilization Field Experiment," co-authored with Christopher Dawes, Peter Loewen, and Costas Panagopoulos. This paper was published (as "Negative Affectivity, Political Contention, and Turnout: A Genopolitics Field Experiment") in Political Psychology.

Jaime received her PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Government at the College of William & Mary. 

Jaime Settle

David Sparks (Duke University).

"Ideological Extremity and the Primary Sources of Polarization," co-authored with Aaron King and Frank Orlando. This paper was published (as "Ideological Extremity and Success in Primary Elections: Drawing Inferences from the Twitter Network") in Social Science Computer Review.

David received his PhD in 2012 and is currently the Director of Basketball Analytics for the Boston Celtics. 

David Sparks

Eitan Tzelgov (Pennsylvania State University).

"A Model of Legislative Heresthetic with an Application to the Israeli Knesset."  This paper was published (as "Damned If You Do and Damned If You Don't: Rhetorical Heresthetic in the Israeli Knesset") in Party Politics, and was included in his dissertation, "Words as Weapons: Opposition Rhetoric and Partisan Strategy" which won the 2014 Carl Albert Award for Best Dissertation in Legislative Studies from the American Political Science Association.

Eitan received his PhD in 2013 and was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Varieties of Democracy Institute at the University of Gothenburg. He is currently Lecturer with Permanancy (Assistant Professor) in Politics in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies at the University of East Anglia.

Eitan Tzelgov

 

New Faces in Political Methodology III was held on May 1, 2010, and featured:

Matthew Buttice (University of California - Davis).

"A Bayesian Approach to Estimating Candidate Characteristics with Expert Data," co-authored with Cherie Maestas and Walt Stone. This paper was published (as "Extracting Wisdom from Experts and Small Crowds: Strategies for Improving Informant-based Measures of Political Concepts") in Political Analysis.

Matt received his PhD in 2012 and is currently Senior Policy Analyst at the Office of the Independent Monitor, City and County of Denver. 

Jason Coronel (University of Illinois).

"If Citizens with Severe Brain Lesions Can Make Rational Voting Decisions, Then So Can Everybody Else," coauthored with Melissa Duff, David Warren, Karen Federmeier, Brian Gonsalves, Daniel Tranel, and Neal Cohen. This paper was published (as "Remembering and Voting: Theory and Evidence from Amnesia Patients") in the American Journal of Political Science.

Jason is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Communication at The Ohio State University.

Jason Coronel

Ines Levin (California Institute of Technology).

"Economic Policy in Times of Crisis and Political Participation: A Multilevel Modeling Approach," co-authored with Andrew Sinclair and Michael Alvarez. This paper was published (as "Participation in the Wake of Adversity: Blame Attribution, Policy-Oriented Evaluations, and Civic Engagement") in Political Behavior.

Ines received her PhD in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC-Irvine.

Ines Levin

Paul Poast (University of Michigan).

"Does Issue Linkage Work? Evidence from European Alliance Negotiations, 1815 to 1945." This paper was published in International Organization.

Paul received his PhD in 2011 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago.

Paul Poast

Marc Ratkovic (University of Wisconsin).

"Identifying the Effects of Political Boundaries: Simultaneous Variable Selection and Curve Fitting through Mixed-Penalty Regularization."

Marc received his PhD in 2011 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton University.

Marc Ratkovic

Maya Sen (Harvard University).

"Quantifying Discrimination: The Role of Race and Gender in the Awarding of Subprime Mortgage Loans."

Maya received her PhD in 2012 and is currently Assistant Professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Maya Sen

Nils Weidmann (Princeton University [Postdoctoral Fellow]).

"Violence and Ethnic Segregation: A Computational Model Applied to Baghdad," coauthored with Idean Salehyan. This paper was published in International Studies Quarterly.

Nils is currently Professor of Political Science and head of the Communication, Networks, and Contention Research Group at  Universitat Konstanz.

Nils Weidmann

Teppei Yamamoto (Princeton University).

"Understanding the Past: Statistical Analysis of Causal Attribution." This paper was published in the American Journal of Political Science.

Teppei is currently Associate Professor and Alfred Henry and Jean Morrison Hayes Chair in the Department of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Teppei Yamamoto

 

New Faces in Political Methodology II was held on May 13, 2009, and featured:

Dino Christenson (Ohio State University).

"Information and Advertising: Multivariate Matching with Campaign Exposure."

Dino received his PhD in 2010 and is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at Boston University and a Faculty Affiliate of the Harari Institute for Computational Science and Engineering.

Dino Christenson

Christopher Dawes (University of California, San Diego).

"Cognitive Ability Mediates the Relationship Betweeh the CHRM2 Gene and Turnout," co-authored with David Cesarini, James Fowler, Magnus Johannesson, Patrik Magnusson, and Sven Oskarsson. This paper was published (as "The Relationship between Genes, Psychological Traits, and Political Participation") in the American Journal of Political Science.

Chris received his PhD in 2011 is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at New York University.

Christopher Dawes

Justin Grimmer (Harvard University).

"A Bayesian Hierarchical Topic Model for Political Texts: Measuring Expressed Agendas in Senate Press Releases." This paper was published in Political Analysis, and the research was part of his book, Representational Style in Congress: What Legislators Say and Why It Matters (Cambridge University Press, 2013), which won the 2014 Richard F. Fenno, Jr. Prize for the best book in legislative studies published in 2013.

Justin received his PhD in 2010 and is currently an Associate Professor in Stanford University's Departments of Political Science and Computer Science. In Fall 2017, he will join the faculty of the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago.

Justin Grimmer

Erin Hartman (University of California, Berkeley).

"Employing Matching to Alleviate Bias in Survey Data."

Erin received her PhD in 2013. In 2012, she ran the polling operation for Obama for America's Analytics department, and later co-founded analytics and technology startup, BlueLabs. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Political Science at UCLA.

Erin Hartman

Julianna Pacheco (Pennsylvania State University).

"Two New Measures of Dynamic Public Opinion in the States Using Item Response Theory." This paper was published (as "Using National Surveys to Measure Dynamic US State Public Opinion: A Guideline for Scholars and an Application.") in State Politics & Policy Quarterly.

Julie earned her PhD in 2010 and was a Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar at the University of Michigan. She is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa.

Julianna Pacheco

Alejandro Quiroz Flores (New York University).

"Testing Copula Functions as a Method to Derive Bivariate Weibull Distributions."

Alex received his PhD in 2010 and is currently Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in the Department of Government at the University of Essex.

Alejandro Quiroz Flores

Adam Ramey (University of Rochester).

"Weighing the Alternatives: Parties, Preferences, and Constituency in the US Congress." This paper was published in the Journal of Politics.

Adam received his PhD in 2010 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at New York University Abu Dhabi.

Adam Ramey

Aaron Strauss (Princeton University)

"Planning the Optimal Get-out-the-vote Campaign Using Randomized Field Experiments," co-authored with Kosuke Imai. This paper was published (as "Estimation of Heterogeneous Treatment Effects from Randomized Experiments, with Application to the Optimal Planning of the Get-Out-the-Vote Campaign") in Political Analysis.

Aaron received his PhD in 2009 and was the Director of Targeting and Data for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee for 2012-13. He is currently Executive Director of the Analyst Institute.

Aaron Strauss

Andrea Abel van Es (Stanford University). 

"Spatial Election Modeling using the Information Filter." 

Andrea received her PhD in 2011 and has served as a Research Consultant for the Global Commissoin for Elections, Democracy, and Security, a Principal Consultant for the International Policy Research and Evaluation Group, and as a Program Manager and Senior Research Fellow with the Electoral Integrity Project. She is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute for Economics and Peace.

Andrea Abel

 

 

 

New Faces in Political Methodology (I? Senior? Classic?) was held on May 3, 2008, and featured ...

Delia Bailey (California Institute of Technology [PhD]; Washington University in St. Louis [Postdoctoral Fellow]).

"A Bayesian Shrinkage Estimator for Ordinal Treatment Variables," coauthored with Michael Alvarez and Jonathan Katz. This paper was published (as "An Empirical Bayes Approach to Estimating Ordinal Treatment Effects.") in Political Analysis

Delia is currently Vice President of Analytics for YouGov and Vice President of Product Development at Crunch.io. 

Delia Bailey

Andrew Eggers (Harvard University). "MPs for Sale? Estimating the Returns to Office in the British House of Commons," co-authored with Jens Hainmueller. This paper was published (as "MPs for Sale? Returns to Office in Postwar British Politics") in the American Political Science Review

Andy received his PhD in 2010 and served from 2011-14 as an Assistant Professor of Government at the London School of Economics. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, a Professorial Fellow of Nuffield College and Director of the Oxford Q-Step Centre.

Andrew Eggers

Melanie Goodrich (New York University).

"A Coding Methodology for Open-Ended Survey Responses."

Melanie received her PhD in 2009 and was most recently a Lead Scientist at Booz Allen Hamilton from 2009-2016. She is currently a Regulatory Specialist with Nasdaq.

Melanie Goodrich

Benjamin Lauderdale (Princeton University).

"Bayesian Social Learning: A Model of Citizen Learning with Implications for Modeling Survey Response." This paper was published (as "Does Inattention to Political Debate Explain the Polarization Gap between the U.S. Congress and Public?") in Public Opinion Quarterly.

Ben received his PhD in 2011 and is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Methodology at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ben Lauderdale

Eduardo Leoni (Columbia University).

"The Political Consequences of Malapportionment."

Eduardo received his PhD in 2008 and is currently Research Manager at Instituto Brasiliero de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE)

Eduardo Leoni

Aya Kachi (University of Illinois).

"Government Formation and Dissolution in Parliamentary Democracies: An Empirical Analysis Using Strategic Survival Models," co-authored with Jude Hays. This paper was published (as "Interdependent Duration Models in Political Science") as a chapter in Quantitative Research in Political Science, in the SAGE Library of Political Science.

Aya received her PhD in 2012 and served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Comparative and International Studies at ETH-Zurich.  She is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Economy of Energy Policy at the University of Basel.

Aya Kachi

Jun Xiang (University of Rochester).

"Modeling Unobservable Political-Military Relevance: A Split-Population Binary Choice Model with an Application to the Trade Conflict Debate." This paper was published (as "Relevance as a Latent Variable in Dyadic Analysis of Conflict") in the Journal of Politics.

Jun received his PhD in 2011 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Economics and Global Affairs at Rutgers University Newark.

Jun Xiang